IBM Ranked World's Leading IT Training Provider

August 16, 2004

IBM today announced that analyst firm International Data Corporation (IDC) has recognized IBM as the industry leader in IT training for the second year in a row. The report, "The Worldwide Top 15 IT Training Providers, 2003," positions IBM as one of the few vendors able to meet broad IT training market demands with multiple solutions. In addition, the report recognizes IBM as being at the forefront of training for advanced and emerging technologies -- such as wireless, Web services and security.

According to the report, to be published on August 30, 2004, IBM's success in IT training is attributed to several key factors. Enhanced by the integration of PwCC's learning services division, IBM is building training into an end-to-end IT solution in support of customer business initiatives. In addition, IBM continues to build its training business around the industry's most prevalent technologies such as Cisco Systems Network Architecture and Microsoft Systems Management Server.

"Because we are seeing an increase in the number of IT professionals aggressively taking charge of their careers, IBM is expanding its technical education and professional training programs in order to meet the demands of today's marketplace," said Greg Schrubbe, director IBM IT Education Services (ITES). "In order to get the most in-demand IT skills and training they need to get ahead, people are turning to IBM."

Another key factor in IBM's success in IT training is the sheer breadth of its go-to-market strategy. IBM serves the needs of large global enterprises, small and medium-sized organizations and now, based on one of IBM's newest initiatives, IT professionals hoping to enhance their technology skills.*

According to the report, IBM also provides training to both IBM customers and IBM Business Partners. The company has established a global network of education partners, including independent training/e-learning providers, IT consultants/systems integrators, and VARs, which sell and deliver company-authorized training.

"IBM's product and service leadership are significant advantages in the IT training market," said Michael Brennan, program director for learning services industry research at IDC, "Being at the forefront of solving companies' business problems with emerging technologies across a broad spectrum puts IBM in a great position to determine what skills people need to stay at the fore."

IBM's learning capabilities and revenue are certainly not limited to just IT training. IBM Learning Solutions, comprised of approximately 3,000 learning professionals, works with clients to increase employee productivity and improve organizational performance.

For additional information on the IDC report, please contact IDC by calling 508-988-7988 or visiting www.idc.com

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