Proceedings of the Royal Society is the parent title of two scientific journals published by the Royal Society. Originally a single journal, it was split into two separate journals in 1905: Series A, which publishes research related to mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences; Series B, which publishes research related to biology

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1905-present
Website
http://rspa.royalsocietypublishing.org/
Impact factor
5.064 (2010)

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Mathematics adds to understanding human disease

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have developed an energy-based mathematical modelling technique to build models of the complex biochemical systems within the human body.

Stick insect's propulsion joint discovered

The stick insect is a popular model organism in biological research for gaining a better understanding of insect walking movements. The advantage of the stick insect is that the structure of its body parts and nervous system ...

New analysis contradicts findings published in Science

New research published in the June 2014 issue of Language presents evidence that the methods employed by the authors of articles published in prestigious international science journals are not supported by a more rigorous ...

Study finds fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes

The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study in Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences reports that several important grazing ...

Barn swallows may indeed have evolved alongside humans

The evolution of barn swallows, a bird ubiquitous to bridges and sheds around the world, might be even more closely tied to humans than previously thought, according to new study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

Marmosets found to learn to take turns when vocalizing

(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of California has found that marmosets learn to wait for others to stop making noise before they vocalize, at a very young age. In their paper published in Proceedings ...

Tiny polyps save corals from predators and disease

In a new study published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society, scientists show how tiny hydrozoans, polyps smaller than one millimeter and commonly found in dense colonies on the surface of hard corals, may play a role ...

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