PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons "by-attribution" license. To fund the journal, the publication s business model requires that, in most cases, authors will pay publication costs. In addition to research articles, PLoS Biology publishes online e-letters in which readers provide comments on articles. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 12.916, ranking it first in the category Biology . Mike Taylor of Discover Magazine said in 2012 that while PLoS Biology has a high impact factor, "PLoS has de-emphasized this traditional, problematic measure, so you won’t find this fact blazoned across their website." The current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Biology can be reused in places other than the original article, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2003–present
Website
http://www.plosbiology.org/
Impact factor
12.916 (2009)

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Specific insulin-like peptide regulates how beetle 'weapons' grow

A scientist from Tokyo Metropolitan University and coworkers have discovered that a specific insulin-like peptide called ILP2 regulates the size of the mandibles in Gnatocerus cornutus beetles in different nutritional environments. ...

Scientists transform a BBQ lighter into a high-tech lab device

Researchers have devised a straightforward technique for building a laboratory device known as an electroporator—which applies a jolt of electricity to temporarily open cell walls—from inexpensive components, including ...

Diet has rapid effects on sperm quality

Sperm are influenced by diet, and the effects arise rapidly. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers at Linköping University, in which healthy young men were fed a diet rich in sugar. The study, which has been published ...

Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life

The mammal tree of life is a real leaner. Some branches are weighed down with thousands of species—we're looking at you, rodents and bats—while others hold just a few species.

Inequity takes a toll on your gut microbes, too

People worry about having access to clean water, power, health care and healthy foods because they are essential for survival. But do they ever think about their access to microbes?

Life, liberty—and access to microbes?

Poverty increases the risk for numerous diseases by limiting people's access to healthy food, environments and stress-free conditions. In a new essay published November 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Suzanne ...

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