PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons "by-attribution" license. To fund the journal, the publication s business model requires that, in most cases, authors will pay publication costs. In addition to research articles, PLoS Biology publishes online e-letters in which readers provide comments on articles. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 12.916, ranking it first in the category Biology . Mike Taylor of Discover Magazine said in 2012 that while PLoS Biology has a high impact factor, "PLoS has de-emphasized this traditional, problematic measure, so you won’t find this fact blazoned across their website." The current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Biology can be reused in places other than the original article, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2003–present
Website
http://www.plosbiology.org/
Impact factor
12.916 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

While the fetal clock develops, mom's behavior tells the time

During fetal development, before the biological clock starts ticking on its own, genes within the fetus's developing clock respond to rhythmic behavior in the mother, according to a new study publishing May 24th in the open-access ...

Additions to natural history collections declining

A new study from the Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates reveals that new additions of vertebrate specimens to natural history collections are declining precipitously. The authors suggest that it is vital to maintain ...

Death in darkness: A new type of cell death discovered in fly guts

A research group led by Sa Kan Yoo at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has discovered a completely unknown type of cell death that takes place in the guts of the common fruit fly. The new process, called ...

New micro-protein helps yeast cells cope with nutrient scarcity

Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Montreal (Canada) have discovered that a micro-protein, which they named Nrs1, supports cell division and proliferation when nutrients are scarce. This ...

page 1 from 30