Palaeontology is one of the two scientific journals of the Palaeontological Association. It was established in 1957. It is published on behalf of the Association by Wiley-Blackwell. The editor-in-chief is David Batten. Palaeontology publishes articles on a range of palaeontological topics, including taphonomy, systematics, and biostratigraphy. According to Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 1.867.

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1957–present
Website
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0031-0239

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Scientists take a closer look at Earth's first animals

When did animals originate? In research published in the journal Palaeontology, we show that this question is answered by Cambrian period fossils of a frond-like sea creature called Stromatoveris psygmoglena.

A new beginning for baby mosasaurs

They weren't in the delivery room, but researchers at Yale University and the University of Toronto have discovered a new birth story for a gigantic marine lizard that once roamed the oceans.

Just how good (or bad) is the fossil record of dinosaurs?

Everyone is excited by discoveries of new dinosaurs – or indeed any new fossil species. But a key question for palaeontologists is 'just how good is the fossil record?' Do we know fifty per cent of the species of dinosaurs ...

Compiling a 'dentist's handbook' for penis worms

A new study of teeth belonging to a particularly phallic-looking creature has led to the compilation of a prehistoric 'dentist's handbook' which may aid in the identification of previously unrecognized specimens from the ...

Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs

A big problem with dinosaurs is that there seem to be too many meat-eaters. From studies of modern animals, there is a feeding pyramid, with plants at the bottom, then plant-eaters, and then meat-eaters at the top.

New study gives weight to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'

A team of researchers from the University of Bristol studying the 'living fossil' Sphenodon - or tuatara - have identified a new way to measure the evolutionary rate of these enigmatic creatures, giving credence to Darwin's ...

'Tully monster' mystery is far from solved, group argues

Last year, headlines in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Scientific American and other outlets declared that a decades-old paleontological mystery had been solved. The "Tully monster," an ancient animal that had long defied ...

page 1 from 5