Open Biology is the Royal Society's fast, open access journal covering biology at the molecular and cellular level. This selective, online journal publishes original, high quality research in cell and developmental biology, molecular and structural biology, biochemistry, neuroscience, immunology, microbiology and genetics. Articles submitted to Open Biology benefit from its broad scope and readership and dedicated media promotion and we also aim for a turnaround time of 4 weeks from submission to first decision.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Website
http://rsob.royalsocietypublishing.org/

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Circadian regulation in the honey bee brain

Circadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.

'Protein missile' raises possibility of disease breakthroughs

University of Dundee researchers have shown that it is possible to rapidly target and destroy specific proteins in cells, raising the possibility of developing new ways of targeting 'undruggable' proteins in diseases.

One hormone to rule them all

Identifying stress hormones in insects can be a step towards environmentally friendly pesticides. Researchers from Stockholm University have discovered that one hormone coordinates the responses to stress in fruit flies. ...

New genes linked with bigger brains identified

A number of new links between families of genes and brain size have been identified by UK scientists, opening up a whole new avenue of research to better understand brain development and diseases like dementia.

Starfish reveal the origins of brain messenger molecules

Biologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the genes in starfish that encode neuropeptides - a common type of chemical found in human brains. The revelation gives researchers new insights into ...

page 1 from 2