Open Biology is the Royal Society's fast, open access journal covering biology at the molecular and cellular level. This selective, online journal publishes original, high quality research in cell and developmental biology, molecular and structural biology, biochemistry, neuroscience, immunology, microbiology and genetics. Articles submitted to Open Biology benefit from its broad scope and readership and dedicated media promotion and we also aim for a turnaround time of 4 weeks from submission to first decision.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Website
http://rsob.royalsocietypublishing.org/

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Rapamycin resolves genetic defects in yeast

Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have taken one step closer to potential cures for several human genetic diseases, and the answers have been found in the humble cells ...

Circadian regulation in the honey bee brain

Circadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.

Transparency in peer review

In 1832, the Royal Society moved from using committee minutes to written peer review reports for determining what was published in Philosophical Transactions. This was conveyed by Frederick Augustus, The Duke of Sussex in ...

Active 24/7 and doing great

Circadian clocks control the day-night cycle of many living beings. But what do the pacemakers do in animals whose activities do not follow this pattern? Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now looked into this ...

'Protein missile' raises possibility of disease breakthroughs

University of Dundee researchers have shown that it is possible to rapidly target and destroy specific proteins in cells, raising the possibility of developing new ways of targeting 'undruggable' proteins in diseases.

One hormone to rule them all

Identifying stress hormones in insects can be a step towards environmentally friendly pesticides. Researchers from Stockholm University have discovered that one hormone coordinates the responses to stress in fruit flies. ...

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