Oikos is a journal issued by the Nordic Ecological Society and is one of the leading peer-reviewed journals in ecology. Oikos publishes original and innovative research on all aspects of ecology, defined as organism-environment interactions. Emphasis is on theoretical and empirical work aimed at generalization and synthesis across taxa, systems and ecological disciplines. Papers can contribute to new developments in ecology by reporting novel theory or critical empirical results, and "synthesis" can include developing new theory, tests of general hypotheses, or bringing together established or emerging areas of ecology. Confirming or extending the established literature, by for example showing results that are novel for a new taxon, is given low priority. We publish standard papers and short papers in the Forum section that aim to stimulate discussion by promoting ideas and synthesis of high novelty. Forum papers should strive for novelty, conceptual unification and serve as a point of departure for future work rather than retrospective summaries of established fields or topics. Papers in the Forum section is given priority in the publication process.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0706
Impact factor
3.393 (2010)

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Ants fight plant diseases

New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 plant diseases. Ants secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. ...

Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the concrete

A North Carolina State University study examining urbanization, scale-insect abundance and latitudinal warming on tree health in the Southeast captured a few surprising results.

Beyond milkweed: Monarchs face habitat, nectar threats

In the face of scientific dogma that faults the population decline of monarch butterflies on a lack of milkweed, herbicides and genetically modified crops, a new Cornell University study casts wider blame: sparse autumnal ...

Climate-warmed leaves change lake ecosystems, study finds

Rising soil temperatures significantly affect autumn leaves and consequently the food web, appearance and biochemical makeup of the lakes and ponds those leaves fall into, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.

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