The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is an English-language peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society. It describes itself as the oldest continuously published medical journal in the world. The journal publishes editorials, papers on original research, review articles, correspondence, and case reports, and has a special section called "Images in Clinical Medicine". In September 1811, John Collins Warren, a Boston physician, along with James Jackson, submitted a formal prospectus to establish the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and Collateral Branches of Science as a medical and philosophical journal. Subsequently, the first issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of Medical Science was published in January 1812. The journal was published quarterly. On April 29, 1823, another publication, the Boston Medical Intelligencer, appeared under the stewardship of Jerome V.C. Smith. The Intelligencer ran into financial troubles in the spring of 1827, and the editors of the New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery and the Collateral Branches of Medical Science purchased it in February 1828

Publisher
Massachusetts Medical Society
Country
United States
History
The New England Journal of Medicine and Surgery (1812–1826);
The New England Medical Review and Journal (1827);
The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (1828–1927);
The New England Journal of Medicine (1928–present)
Website
http://www.nejm.org/
Impact factor
53.484 (2010)

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