Nature Physics, is a monthly, peer reviewed, scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group. It was first published in October 2005 (volume 1, issue 1). The Chief Editor is Alison Wright, who is a full-time professional editor employed by this journal. The impact factor for Nature Physics in 2010 is 18.423, according to Journal Citation Reports. Research paper formats include letters, full length articles, review articles, news, views, physics research highlights, commentaries, book reviews, and correspondence. The main focus of Nature Physics pure and applied physics research, encompassing core physics disciplines and broad topical coverage that is related to these core disciplines. Hence, subject areas cover an exploration and investigation of nature and substances that exist in the world and the universe, from atomic to cosmological scales. This encompasses defining and describing observations, interactions, and forces which occur in nature and, hence, in substances. Such descriptions may include their effect on, or within, a given natural system. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Website
http://www.nature.com/nphys/index.html

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Cooling of a trapped ion to the quantum regime

Neutral atoms and charged ions can be cooled down to extremely low temperatures (i.e., to microkelvins, 1 millionth of a degree above absolute zero) using laser techniques. At these low temperatures, the particles have often ...

3-D imaging the flavor content of the nucleon

The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, in an experiment led by researchers at Faculté des Sciences de Monastir in Tunisia, Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay in France and Old Dominion University in the United States, ...

New quantum switch turns metals into insulators

Most modern electronic devices rely on tiny, finely-tuned electrical currents to process and store information. These currents dictate how fast our computers run, how regularly our pacemakers tick and how securely our money ...

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