Researchers develop flexible, stretchable photonic devices

Researchers at MIT and several other institutions have developed a method for making photonic devices—similar to electronic devices but based on light rather than electricity—that can bend and stretch without damage. ...

Guiding the random laser

At its most basic level, a random laser is precisely what its name implies; random. It's random in the spectrum of light it produces and in the way that light is emitted, making what could be an extremely versatile laser ...

Deep learning reconstructs holograms

Deep learning has been experiencing a true renaissance especially over the last decade, and it uses multi-layered artificial neural networks for automated analysis of data. Deep learning is one of the most exciting forms ...

The beam of invisibility

How do we make an object invisible? Researchers from TU Wien (Vienna), together with colleagues from Greece and the USA, have now developed a new idea for a cloaking technology. A completely opaque material is irradiated ...

Freeform optical device packs more punch in a smaller package

In a recent paper in Light: Science & Applications, University of Rochester researchers Jannick Rolland and Jacob Reimers describe an optical device with potential applications ranging from improved satellite and diagnostic ...

Imaging at the speed of light

Tiny micro- and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties.

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