The Journal of Systematic Palaeontology publishes papers which use systematics in ways that significantly advance our understanding of palaeogeography, palaeobiology, functional morphology, palaeoecology, biostratigraphy or phylogenetic relationships, as well as papers describing new or poorly understood fossil faunas and floras. Shorter contributions on technical or conceptual issues relating to systematic methodology and conservation issues are also welcome. However, papers that simply present systematic descriptions without attempting to explain their broader significance will not be published. Collections of thematic papers, such as those arising from symposia, are occasionally published, and these may have a more liberal remit.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis Group
Website
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tjsp20/current
Impact factor
3.000 (2011)

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New hadrosaur noses into spotlight

Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs – a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists from North Carolina State University and Brigham ...

New ancient otter species among largest ever found

Dr. Denise Su, curator and head of paleobotany and paleoecology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History was co-author on new research that described a species of otter new to science and that is among the largest otter ...

New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia

A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings, published in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, are based on fossilised ...

Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified

The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. This dinosaur has been named ...

Paleontologists identify new species of mosasaur

A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took ...

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