The Journal of Experimental Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal in the field of comparative physiology and integrative biology. It is published by The Company of Biologists from editorial offices in Cambridge, United Kingdom. The journal was established in Edinburgh in 1923, entitled The British Journal of Experimental Biology (Br. J. Exp. Biol.: ISSN 0366-0788). It was published by Oliver and Boyd and edited by F. A. E. Crew and an Editorial Board of nine members including Julian Huxley. However, the journal soon ran into financial trouble and was rescued in 1925 by G. P. Bidder, the founder of the The Company of Biologists. Following the appointment of Sir James Gray as the journal s first Editor-in-Chief in 1925, the journal was renamed The Journal of Experimental Biology in 1929 (ISSN 0022-0949). Since the journal s establishment in 1923, there have been seven Editors-in-Chief: Sir James Gray (1926–1955), J. A. Ramsay (1952–1974), Sir Vincent Wigglesworth (1955–1974), John Treherne (1974–1989), Charlie Ellington (1989–1994), and Bob Boutilier (1994–2003). As of 2004, Hans Hoppeler (Bern) is the journal s current Editor-in-Chief. The journal has published

Publisher
Company of Biologists The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1923-present
Website
http://jeb.biologists.org
Impact factor
3.040 (2010)

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The origins of polarized nervous systems

(Phys.org)—There is no mistaking the first action potential you ever fired. It was the one that blocked all the other sperm from stealing your egg. After that, your spikes only got more interesting. Waves of calcium flooding ...

New study tells the tale of a kangaroo's tail

Kangaroos may be nature's best hoppers. But when they are grazing on all fours, which is most of the time, their tail becomes a powerful fifth leg, says a new study.

The power of estrogen -- male snakes attract other males

A new study has shown that boosting the estrogen levels of male garter snakes causes them to secrete the same pheromones that females use to attract suitors, and turned the males into just about the sexiest snake in the neighborhood ...

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

Attaching its head to its tail to form a ring, a 3-millimeter larva of the goldenrod gall midge squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section, swelling it and raising the pressure like an inner tube.

Climate change may be putting beluga whales out of their depths

An international team of researchers has found that the physical condition of beluga whales affects their capacity to store oxygen in their blood and muscle tissues, likely impacting their ability to dive. In a paper published ...

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age

The consequences of aging are damage and degeneration of cells, which leads to loss of function, vulnerability to disease, and eventually, death. A hallmark of the aging process is the progressive decline of the nervous system, ...

Dung beetles navigate better under a full moon

Of all nocturnal animals, only dung beetles can hold their course using polarized moonlight. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that beetles can use polarized light when its signal strength is weak, which ...

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