The Journal of Experimental Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal in the field of comparative physiology and integrative biology. It is published by The Company of Biologists from editorial offices in Cambridge, United Kingdom. The journal was established in Edinburgh in 1923, entitled The British Journal of Experimental Biology (Br. J. Exp. Biol.: ISSN 0366-0788). It was published by Oliver and Boyd and edited by F. A. E. Crew and an Editorial Board of nine members including Julian Huxley. However, the journal soon ran into financial trouble and was rescued in 1925 by G. P. Bidder, the founder of the The Company of Biologists. Following the appointment of Sir James Gray as the journal s first Editor-in-Chief in 1925, the journal was renamed The Journal of Experimental Biology in 1929 (ISSN 0022-0949). Since the journal s establishment in 1923, there have been seven Editors-in-Chief: Sir James Gray (1926–1955), J. A. Ramsay (1952–1974), Sir Vincent Wigglesworth (1955–1974), John Treherne (1974–1989), Charlie Ellington (1989–1994), and Bob Boutilier (1994–2003). As of 2004, Hans Hoppeler (Bern) is the journal s current Editor-in-Chief. The journal has published

Publisher
Company of Biologists The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1923-present
Website
http://jeb.biologists.org
Impact factor
3.040 (2010)

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Human medicines affect fish behavior

Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University. The results reinforce that the signal substances ...

World's fastest ant hits recording breaking speed of 855mm/s

According to Noël Coward, mad dogs and Englishmen are the only creatures that go out in the midday sun, but Harald Wolf from the University of Ulm, Germany, would add another animal: Saharan silver ants (Cataglyphis bombycina). ...

Honeybees are math stars (Update)

Start thinking about numbers and they can become large very quickly. The diameter of the universe is about 8.8×1023 km and the largest number with a name—googolplex, 1010100—outranks it enormously. Although that colossal ...

'Yank': A new term in biophysics

Biologists and biomedical engineers are proposing to define the term "yank" for changes in force over time, something that our muscles and nerves can feel and respond to.

Caffeine does not influence stingless bees

The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) that has a sting for use in defense is common in Western Europe. Stingless bees, on the other hand, are mainly at home in the tropics and subtropics. They are a very social group and ...

What goes up must come down—landing locusts crash on their heads

For many grasshoppers and other insects jumping is a fast and effective way to escape from their predators. In particular desert locusts are known for their powerful jumps. To avoid catapulting into the wrong direction, locusts ...

Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?

Attaching its head to its tail to form a ring, a 3-millimeter larva of the goldenrod gall midge squeezes some internal fluids into its tail section, swelling it and raising the pressure like an inner tube.

How invading fungus forces zombie ant's death grip

If it's thoughts of zombies that keep you awake at night, you shouldn't be worried about zombie humans; it's the carpenter ants (Camponotus castaneus) that should concern you most. When infected by a specialised fungus (Ophiocordyceps ...

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