The Journal of Experimental Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal in the field of comparative physiology and integrative biology. It is published by The Company of Biologists from editorial offices in Cambridge, United Kingdom. The journal was established in Edinburgh in 1923, entitled The British Journal of Experimental Biology (Br. J. Exp. Biol.: ISSN 0366-0788). It was published by Oliver and Boyd and edited by F. A. E. Crew and an Editorial Board of nine members including Julian Huxley. However, the journal soon ran into financial trouble and was rescued in 1925 by G. P. Bidder, the founder of the The Company of Biologists. Following the appointment of Sir James Gray as the journal s first Editor-in-Chief in 1925, the journal was renamed The Journal of Experimental Biology in 1929 (ISSN 0022-0949). Since the journal s establishment in 1923, there have been seven Editors-in-Chief: Sir James Gray (1926–1955), J. A. Ramsay (1952–1974), Sir Vincent Wigglesworth (1955–1974), John Treherne (1974–1989), Charlie Ellington (1989–1994), and Bob Boutilier (1994–2003). As of 2004, Hans Hoppeler (Bern) is the journal s current Editor-in-Chief. The journal has published

Publisher
Company of Biologists The Company of Biologists
Country
United Kingdom
History
1923-present
Website
http://jeb.biologists.org
Impact factor
3.040 (2010)

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