The Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1905. Since 1925 it is published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It covers research in any area of biochemistry or molecular biology. The editor-in-chief is Herbert Tabor. All its articles are available free one year after publication. In press articles are available free on its website immediately after acceptance. The journal was established in 1905 by John Jacob Abel and Christian Archibald Herter, who also served as the first editors; the first issue appeared in October 1905. The location of the journal s editorial offices has included Cornell Medical College (until 1937), Yale University (1937–1958), Harvard University (1958–1967), and New York (from 1967). The journal is currently published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) at the ASBMB offices in Rockville, Maryland. The following individuals have served as editors-in-chief: The editors of the Journal of Biological Chemistry have criticized the modern reliance upon the impact factor for ranking journals, noting that review articles, commentaries,

Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Country
United States
History
1905–present
Website
http://www.jbc.org/
Impact factor
5.328 (2010)

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Analyzing poppies to make better drugs

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Researchers have uncovered an unusual protein activity in rice that can be exploited to give crops an edge in the evolutionary arms race against rice blast disease, a major threat to rice production around the world.

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Steroid binding to metabolic enzyme

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New family on the block: A novel group of glycosidic enzymes

A group of researchers from Japan has discovered a novel enzyme from a soil fungus. In their study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, they speculate that this enzyme plays important roles in the soil ecosystem, ...

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