The Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1905. Since 1925 it is published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It covers research in any area of biochemistry or molecular biology. The editor-in-chief is Herbert Tabor. All its articles are available free one year after publication. In press articles are available free on its website immediately after acceptance. The journal was established in 1905 by John Jacob Abel and Christian Archibald Herter, who also served as the first editors; the first issue appeared in October 1905. The location of the journal s editorial offices has included Cornell Medical College (until 1937), Yale University (1937–1958), Harvard University (1958–1967), and New York (from 1967). The journal is currently published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) at the ASBMB offices in Rockville, Maryland. The following individuals have served as editors-in-chief: The editors of the Journal of Biological Chemistry have criticized the modern reliance upon the impact factor for ranking journals, noting that review articles, commentaries,

Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Country
United States
History
1905–present
Website
http://www.jbc.org/
Impact factor
5.328 (2010)

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Can we cure cancer by finding out how two proteins interact?

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Dr. Özdemir has studied two protein families named Rho GTPases and IQGAPs, which are known to play an important role in cancer metastasis. These two "suspicious" ...

Using a promiscuous inhibitor to uncover cancer drug targets

Scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a method that exploits the multitargeted nature of a chemical inhibitor to pinpoint vulnerabilities within cancer cells.

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design ...

How do protein tangles get so long in Alzheimer's?

Early in the course of Alzheimer's disease—long before future patients begin to notice symptoms—neurofibrillary tangles composed of tau protein aggregates begin to form in their brain cells. How toxic these aggregates ...

Anticancer mechanism revealed in yeast experiments

Much like shoelaces or dangly necklaces, DNA strands can tangle up in unruly knots. Specialized enzymes keep DNA organized when cells divide, so the cells split smoothly and don't get stuck. But in tumor cells, this failsafe ...

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