The Journal of Applied Ecology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing research in all areas of environmental management. It began publication in 1964 and is the third oldest journal of the British Ecological Society (after the Journal of Ecology and the Journal of Animal Ecology). It is available both in print and online. The journal publishes the following types of papers:

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the British Ecological Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
1964-present
Website
http://www.journalofappliedecology.org
Impact factor
4.970 (2010)

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Species on the move

A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) - as revealed in a new ...

Study identifies how to verify whether MPAs are effective

Marine protected areas, or MPAS, are an increasingly common way of protecting marine ecosystems by prohibiting fishing in specific locations. However, many people remain skeptical that MPAs actually benefit fish populations, ...

Effect of insecticides on damselflies greater than expected

The latest research from the Leiden outdoor laboratory "Living Lab' shows that the insecticide thiacloprid strongly influences even the most common and robust dragonfly species in the Netherlands. The study was published ...

Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance

Bees are valuable to humans not only because they produce honey, but also because they pollinate wildflowers and food crops. They exclusively eat nectar and pollen. So in areas where intensive agriculture is practised, they ...

Destructive insect outbreaks and cod collapse

When fundamental changes started to happen in three ecosystems in North America, people reacted: They completely stopped pollution, forestry and fishing. But these measures were futile; it was impossible to bring the ecosystems ...

Fisheries outcomes maximized through traditional practice

A new study led by a University of Rhode Island doctoral student and published in the Journal of Applied Ecology has found a possible solution to one of the biggest conservation and livelihood challenges in the marine realm.

Working landscapes can support diverse bird species

Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

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