Published monthly by The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS), JOM is a technical journal devoted to exploring the many aspects of materials science and engineering. JOM reports scholarly work that explores the state-of-the-art processing, fabrication, design, and application of metals, ceramics, plastics, composites, and other materials. In pursuing this goal, JOM strives to balance the interests of the laboratory and the marketplace by reporting academic, industrial, and government-sponsored work from around the world. Written for academic and industrial audiences alike, the journal is distributed to all members of TMS as well as nonmember subscribers; as a result, more than 10,000 individual readers see the journal each monthly. Additionally, the journal reaches more than 3,000 institutions and libraries. The readership consists of scientific, engineering, and management professionals and students from the manufacturing, processing, research, and academic sectors of the international materials community.

Publisher
Springer
Website
http://www.jomgateway.net/JournalHome.aspx?JournalID=11837

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Researchers report cybersecurity risks in 3D printing

Additive manufacturing (AM), commonly called 3D printing, is a $4 billion business set to quadruple by 2020. One day, manufacturers may print everything from cars to medicines, disrupting centuries-old production practices. ...

Taking a close look at metal 3-D printing

In the wee hours of a Saturday morning, Carnegie Mellon University Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Tony Rollett and graduate students Ross Cunningham and Tugce Ozturk sit together in Sector 2 of the mile-wide ...

New high-volume joining process expands use of aluminum in autos

Researchers have demonstrated a new process for the expanded use of lightweight aluminum in cars and trucks at the speed, scale, quality and consistency required by the auto industry. The process reduces production time and ...

Researchers model spent nuclear fuels

(Phys.org) —Lawrence Livermore scientists have modeled actinide-based alloys, such as spent nuclear fuel, in an effort to predict the impact of evolving fuel chemistry on material performance.