Global Change Biology exists to promote understanding of the interface between all aspects of current environmental change that affects a substantial part of the globe and biological systems. Studies must concern biological systems, regardless of whether they are aquatic or terrestrial, and managed or natural environments. Both biological responses and feedbacks to change are included, and may be considered at any level of organization from molecular to biome. Studies may employ theoretical, modeling, analytical, experimental, observational, and historical approaches and should be exploratory rather than confirmatory. GCB publishes primary research articles, technical advances, research reviews, commentaries and letters.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2486
Impact factor
6.346 (2010)

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Mammal biodiversity shapes disease risk

To predict the spillover of pathogens from wildlife to humans and limit future pandemics, it is important to understand where wildlife disease risk is highest. A team of researchers, led by Wageningen University & Research ...

Bird and mammal diversity is declining with biological invasions

The introduction of invasive species leads to a decline in certain native species. A team of researchers from the CNRS and the University of Paris-Saclay has managed to show that 11% of the global phylogenetic diversity of ...

Complex marine forests collapsing into flat turf seascapes

An international study led by The University of Western Australia has found that temperate marine ecosystems dominated by marine forests are collapsing into flattened seascapes of short turf algae across the globe.

The shifting dynamics of temperate marine ecosystems

At Shikine Island, Japan, kelp forests and abalone fisheries were once common, but over the last twenty years they have disappeared. Now, researchers from Japan have discovered that these temperate coastal marine ecosystems ...

Urban life is not to everyone's taste

Habitat change, for example through urbanization, is one of the most important causes of biodiversity decline. By 2050, settlements and cities across the globe are predicted to increase by two to three million square kilometers—about ...

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