Global Change Biology exists to promote understanding of the interface between all aspects of current environmental change that affects a substantial part of the globe and biological systems. Studies must concern biological systems, regardless of whether they are aquatic or terrestrial, and managed or natural environments. Both biological responses and feedbacks to change are included, and may be considered at any level of organization from molecular to biome. Studies may employ theoretical, modeling, analytical, experimental, observational, and historical approaches and should be exploratory rather than confirmatory. GCB publishes primary research articles, technical advances, research reviews, commentaries and letters.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2486
Impact factor
6.346 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

How an urban bat differs from a rural bat

Some bat species are more likely to be found in cities than in the countryside. A scientific team from Freie Universität Berlin, the University of Greifswald, the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries ...

W. Mediterranean hit by 'exceptional' heatwave: experts

An "exceptional" marine heatwave is gripping the western Mediterranean with surface temperatures up to five degrees Celsius (41 degrees Fahrenheit) hotter than average, according to experts contacted by AFP.

Do fish suffer from oxygen starvation?

Larger fish are more likely to experience oxygen deficiency in warming water than smaller species. The same applies to fish with large cells, note researchers at Radboud University in their latest study. In addition, marine ...

Ocean warming threatens richest marine biodiversity

An international team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Adelaide has revealed that rates of future warming threaten marine life in more than 70% of the most biodiverse-rich areas of Earth's oceans.

Monarch butterfly populations are thriving in North America

For years, scientists have warned that monarch butterflies are dying off in droves because of diminishing winter colonies. But new research from the University of Georgia shows that the summer population of monarchs has remained ...

page 1 from 40