Global Change Biology exists to promote understanding of the interface between all aspects of current environmental change that affects a substantial part of the globe and biological systems. Studies must concern biological systems, regardless of whether they are aquatic or terrestrial, and managed or natural environments. Both biological responses and feedbacks to change are included, and may be considered at any level of organization from molecular to biome. Studies may employ theoretical, modeling, analytical, experimental, observational, and historical approaches and should be exploratory rather than confirmatory. GCB publishes primary research articles, technical advances, research reviews, commentaries and letters.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2486
Impact factor
6.346 (2010)

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Compost key to sequestering carbon in the soil

By moving beyond the surface level and literally digging deep, scientists at the University of California, Davis, found that compost is a key to storing carbon in semi-arid cropland soils, a strategy for offsetting CO2 emissions.

An 88 percent decline in large freshwater animals

Rivers and lakes cover just about one percent of Earth's surface, but are home to one third of all vertebrate species worldwide. At the same time, freshwater life is highly threatened. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute ...

When invasive plants take root, native animals pay the price

Imagine a new breed of pirate not only able to sail the high seas, but to exploit nearly any mode of transportation without detection. And these raiders' ambitions have little to do with amassing treasure and everything to ...

Declining fire threatens Serengeti ecosystem

A study of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem led by University of Liverpool researchers has found that an increase in livestock numbers is threatening the ecology of the region due to a decline in both the number and area of land ...

In search of an undersea kelp forest's missing nitrogen

Plants need nutrients to grow. So scientists were surprised to learn that giant kelp maintains its impressive growth rates year-round, even in summer and early fall when ocean currents along the California coast stop delivering ...

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