Ecology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Marcel Holyoak (University of California, Davis) took over as editor in chief from Michael Hochberg in 2008. It is published monthly in print and online. Ecology Letters is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search/Academic Search Premier, AGRICOLA, Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts, Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS and BIOSIS Previews, CAB Abstracts, CAB Health/CABDirect, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts databases, Current Contents/Agriculture, Biology & Environmental Sciences, GEOBASE, GeoRef, Index Medicus/MEDLINE, InfoTrac, PubMed, Science Citation Index, Scopus, and The Zoological Record. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 15.253, ranking it 66th out of 7943 scientific and medical journals listed and the first out of 129 journals in the category "Ecology". Ecology Letters covers topics in

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1998-present
Website
http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1461-023x
Impact factor
15.253 (2010)

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Study finds natural selection favors cheaters

Mutualisms, which are interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties, are found everywhere—from exchanges between pollinators and the plants they pollinate, to symbiotic interactions between ...

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