Ecology Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-Blackwell and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Marcel Holyoak (University of California, Davis) took over as editor in chief from Michael Hochberg in 2008. It is published monthly in print and online. Ecology Letters is abstracted and indexed in Academic Search/Academic Search Premier, AGRICOLA, Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts, Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS and BIOSIS Previews, CAB Abstracts, CAB Health/CABDirect, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts databases, Current Contents/Agriculture, Biology & Environmental Sciences, GEOBASE, GeoRef, Index Medicus/MEDLINE, InfoTrac, PubMed, Science Citation Index, Scopus, and The Zoological Record. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 15.253, ranking it 66th out of 7943 scientific and medical journals listed and the first out of 129 journals in the category "Ecology". Ecology Letters covers topics in

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
History
1998-present
Website
http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1461-023x
Impact factor
15.253 (2010)

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Climate change increases risks of tree death

Planting a tree seems like a generally good thing to do for the environment. Trees, after all, take in carbon dioxide, offsetting some of the emissions that contribute to climate change.

Tiny mite triggers domino effect in the high Andes

The idea of food chains and food webs in the animal kingdom is simple: Remove a link or thread, and the system is broken. But nature is complex, and it's not always clear how the absence of one species may impact others.

New model links mate selection to species survival

In a new paper published in Ecology Letters, Michigan State University evolutionary biologist Janette Boughman shows that the process of choosing a mate could be very important to the survival of the species. To do this, ...

In bird couples, who is taking care of the kids?

Sex roles in birds describe sex differences in courtship, mate competition, social pair-bonds, and parental care. Different explanations have been put forward to explain these differences but none are based on a comprehensive ...

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