Biomedical Optics Express is OSA's principal outlet for serving the biomedical optics community with rapid, open-access, peer-reviewed papers related to optics, photonics and imaging in the life sciences. The journal scope encompasses theoretical modeling and simulations, technology development, and biomedical studies and clinical applications. Topics include tissue optics and spectroscopy; laser interactions with and manipulation of molecules, cells and tissues; novel microscopies; optical coherence tomography; diffuse optical tomography; photoacoustic and multimodal imaging; molecular imaging and probe development; optical therapies; biosensing; optical biophysics; nanobiophotonics; photobiology; microfluidic optical devices; image reconstruction; and vision research.

Publisher
OSA
Website
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/home.cfm

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Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level

Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or ...

Shrinking a medical lab to fit on a fingertip

Identifying a patient's viral infection or diagnosing a blood disorder usually requires a lab and skilled technicians. But researchers at Princeton University have developed a new technology that goes a long way toward replacing ...

Researchers create smartphone system to test for lead in water

The discovery of lead in Flint, Michigan's drinking water drew renewed attention to the health risks posed by the metal. Now researchers at the University of Houston have created an inexpensive system using a smartphone and ...

Fluorescence microscopy gets the BAMM treatment

A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can ...

Ultrathin endoscope captures neurons firing deep in the brain

Researchers have developed an endoscope as thin as a human hair that can image the activity of neurons in the brains of living mice. Because it is so thin, the endoscope can reach deep into the brain, giving researchers access ...

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