Biomedical Optics Express is OSA's principal outlet for serving the biomedical optics community with rapid, open-access, peer-reviewed papers related to optics, photonics and imaging in the life sciences. The journal scope encompasses theoretical modeling and simulations, technology development, and biomedical studies and clinical applications. Topics include tissue optics and spectroscopy; laser interactions with and manipulation of molecules, cells and tissues; novel microscopies; optical coherence tomography; diffuse optical tomography; photoacoustic and multimodal imaging; molecular imaging and probe development; optical therapies; biosensing; optical biophysics; nanobiophotonics; photobiology; microfluidic optical devices; image reconstruction; and vision research.

Publisher
OSA
Website
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/home.cfm

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New optical method paves way to breath test for cancer biomarker

Researchers have developed an extremely sensitive, yet simple optical method for detecting formaldehyde in a person's breath. Because formaldehyde is being studied as a potential biomarker for lung and breast cancer, the ...

Print your own laboratory-grade microscope for US$18

For the first time, labs around the world can 3-D print their own precision microscopes to analyse samples and detect diseases, thanks to an open-source design created at the University of Bath.

When space travel is a blur

Canadian scientists are working on a new way to measure the mechanics of the human eye to better identify astronauts at risk of developing ocular damage before they go into space. Collaborating with the Canadian Space Agency ...

A computer model has learned to detect prostate cancer

Scientists at the TSU Laboratory of Biophotonics, working with Tomsk National Research Medical Center (TNIMC) oncologists, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, a malignant tumor of the prostate ...

Non-invasive imaging method spots cancer at the molecular level

Researchers for the first time have combined a powerful microscopy technique with automated image analysis algorithms to distinguish between healthy and metastatic cancerous tissue without relying on invasive biopsies or ...

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