Biological Reviews covers the entire range of the biological sciences, presenting several review articles per issue. Although scholarly and with extensive bibliographies, the articles are aimed at non-specialist biologists as well as researchers in the field. Authors are specifically instructed to be aware of this fact in their writing, and the resulting reviews serve as extensive introductions to particular fields, defining the state of the art, and drawing attention to gaps in knowledge. Articles are up to 20,000 words long and each contains an abstract, a thorough introduction and statement of conclusions.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1469-185X
Impact factor
9.067 (2011)

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How do human impacts on wetlands affect animals?

A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity.

Measuring global biodiversity change

A new paper co-authored by a group of international scientists, among them UvA researcher W. Daniel Kissling, shows how Essential Biodiversity Variables can be produced to measure biodiversity change at a global scale. The ...

Reinterpreting the fossil record on jaws

Scientists use the fossil record to make judgments on the physiology and behavior of species. But are those interpretations correct? New research from a team of researchers led by Matthew Ravosa, professor of biology and ...

Reduced ecosystem functions in oil palm plantations

So far, research on the environmental impact of oil palm cultivation has been scattered and patchy. Synthesizing about 1000 scientific studies and reports, the scientists were now able to give a balanced report on the changes ...

Why is female sexuality more flexible than male sexuality?

A new evolutionary theory argues that women may have been evolutionarily designed to be sexually fluid—changing their sexual desires and identities from lesbian, to bisexual, to heterosexual and back again—in order to ...

The status quo on Europe's mussels

Mussels are the natural treatment plants of bodies of water and, therefore, just as important as bees. Unfortunately, they are equally threatened: most of the world's mussel stocks are in decline and some species face extinction. ...

Challenges to conserving freshwater mussels in Europe

New research looks at the status of the 16 currently recognized freshwater mussel species in Europe, finding that information is unevenly distributed with considerable differences in data quality and quantity among countries ...

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