Astrophysical Journal

The Astrophysical Journal is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering astronomy and astrophysics. It was founded in 1895 by the American astronomers George Ellery Hale and James Edward Keeler. It publishes three 500-page issues per month. Since 1953, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series has been published in conjunction with The Astrophysical Journal. It aims to supplement the material in the journal. It publishes six volumes per year, with two 280-page issues per volume. The journal and the supplement series were both published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society. In January 2009 publication was transferred to Institute of Physics Publishing, following the move of the society s Astronomical Journal in 2008. The reason for the changes were given by the Society as the increasing financial demands of the Press. The Astrophysical Journal Letters is another section of The Astrophysical Journal intended to publish rapid communications.

Publisher
Institute of Physics Publishing
Country
United States
History
1895–present
Impact factor
6.063 (Journal)
5.158 (Letters)
15.206 (Supplement) (2010)
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New NASA mission could find more than 1,000 planets

A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth's solar system, new research suggests.

dateFeb 25, 2019 in Astronomy
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Revealing the black hole at the heart of the galaxy

Including the powerful ALMA into an array of telescopes for the first time, astronomers have found that the emission from the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* at the center of the galaxy comes from a smaller region ...

dateJan 22, 2019 in Astronomy
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Where is the universe hiding its missing mass?

Astronomers have spent decades looking for something that sounds like it would be hard to miss: about a third of the "normal" matter in the Universe. New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory may have helped them ...

dateFeb 15, 2019 in Astronomy
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An exoplanet with an 11-hour orbit

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) was launched on April 18 of last year with the primary objective of discovering transiting planets smaller than Neptune around stars bright enough for spectroscopic investigations ...

dateFeb 22, 2019 in Astronomy
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