Applied Physics Letters is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that is published 52 times per year by the American Institute of Physics. Its focus is rapid publication and dissemination of new experimental and theoretical papers regarding applications of physics in all disciplines of science, engineering, and modern technology. Additionally, there is an emphasis on fundamental and decisive new developments which lay the groundwork for fields that are rapidly evolving. The journal was established in 1962. The editor in chief is Nghi Q. Lam of the Argonne National Laboratory. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.820, ranking it first out of 105 in the discipline of applied physics. In 2009, it also ranked first out of 105 journals assessed in this discipline.

Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Country
United States
History
1962–present
Website
http://apl.aip.org/
Impact factor
3.844 (2011)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Terahertz technology escapes the cold

Terahertz (THz) radiation is a bit like a treasure chest that resists being opened fully. Residing in the electromagnetic spectrum between the infrared and microwave regions, THz radiation combines a range of properties that ...

A new 'golden' age for electronics?

One way that heat damages electronic equipment is it makes components expand at different rates, resulting in forces that cause micro-cracking and distortion. Plastic components and circuit boards are particularly prone to ...

Quantum information gets a boost from thin-film breakthrough

Efforts to create reliable light-based quantum computing, quantum key distribution for cybersecurity, and other technologies got a boost from a new study demonstrating an innovative method for creating thin films to control ...

Learning magnets could lead to energy-efficient data processing

The power consumption of data centers around the world is increasing. This creates a high demand for new technologies that could lead to energy-efficient computers. In a new study, physicists at Radboud University have demonstrated ...

page 1 from 50