American Antiquity is one of the principal journals of the Society for American Archaeology. The journal is a benefit of membership in the SAA. This section includes tables of contents for issues beginning in 1995. All table of contents dating back to the volume 1, 1935 are available! You can also order back issues through the SAA Marketplace, visit the American Antiquity editorial office, and view over 60 years of American Antiquity on-line through JSTOR.

Publisher
Society for American Archaeology
Website
http://www.saa.org/AbouttheSociety/Publications/AmericanAntiquity.aspx

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Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture

Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still a subject of debate. In a new study, scientists ...

The life and death of one of America's most mysterious trees

A majestic ponderosa pine, standing tall in what is widely thought to have been the "center of the world" for the Ancestral Puebloan people, may have more mundane origins than previously believed, according to research led ...

Who dominates the discourse of the past?

Male academics, who comprise less than 10 percent of North American archaeologists, write the vast majority of the field's high impact, peer-reviewed literature.

Food for thought: Why did we ever start farming?

The reason that humans shifted away from hunting and gathering, and to agriculture—a much more labor-intensive process—has always been a riddle. It is only more confusing because the shift happened independently in about ...

3,000-year-old eastern North American quinoa discovered in Ontario

A mass of charred seeds found while clearing a home construction site in Brantford, Ontario, has been identified as ancient, domesticated goosefoot (C. berlandieri spp. jonesianum), a form of quinoa native to Eastern North ...

Study rewrites the history of corn in corn country

A new study contradicts decades of thought, research and teaching on the history of corn cultivation in the American Bottom, a floodplain of the Mississippi River in Illinois. The study refutes the notion that Indian corn, ...

Fresh look at burials, mass graves, tells a new story of Cahokia

A new study challenges earlier interpretations of an important burial mound at Cahokia, a pre-Columbian city in Illinois near present-day St. Louis. The study reveals that a central feature of the mound, a plot known as the ...

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