ACS Nano is a monthly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal, first published in August 2007 by the American Chemical Society. The current editor in chief is Paul S. Weiss (University of California, Los Angeles). The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, perspectives, interviews with distinguished researchers, views on the future of nanoscience and nanotechnology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, ACS Nano has a 2010 impact factor of 9.855. The focus of ACS Nano is synthesis, assembly, characterization, theory, and simulation of nanostructures, nanotechnology, nanofabrication, self assembly, nanoscience methodology, and nanotechnology methodology. The focus also includes nanoscience and nanotechnology research - the scope of which is chemistry, biology, materials science, physics, and engineering.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2007-present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3
Impact factor
9.855 (2010)

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