ACS Nano is a monthly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal, first published in August 2007 by the American Chemical Society. The current editor in chief is Paul S. Weiss (University of California, Los Angeles). The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, perspectives, interviews with distinguished researchers, views on the future of nanoscience and nanotechnology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, ACS Nano has a 2010 impact factor of 9.855. The focus of ACS Nano is synthesis, assembly, characterization, theory, and simulation of nanostructures, nanotechnology, nanofabrication, self assembly, nanoscience methodology, and nanotechnology methodology. The focus also includes nanoscience and nanotechnology research - the scope of which is chemistry, biology, materials science, physics, and engineering.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2007-present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3
Impact factor
9.855 (2010)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Substrate defects key to growth of 2-D materials

Creating two-dimentional materials large enough to use in electronics is a challenge despite huge effort but now, Penn State researchers have discovered a method for improving the quality of one class of 2-D materials, with ...

Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide

The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results. When potassium bromide molecules arrange themselves between graphene and copper, it results in electronic decoupling. ...

DNA folds into a smart nanocapsule for drug delivery

Researchers from University of Jyväskylä and Aalto University in Finland have developed a customized DNA nanostructure that can perform a predefined task in human body-like conditions. To do so, the team built a capsule-like ...

Imaging system helps surgeons remove tiny ovarian tumors

Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage, with many tumors spread throughout the abdomen. Most patients undergo surgery to remove as many of these tumors as possible, but because some ...

The golden path towards new two-dimensional semiconductors

Two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors are promising for quantum computing and future electronics. Now, researchers can convert metallic gold into semiconductor and customize the material atom-by-atom on boron nitride nanotubes.

page 1 from 49