ACS Nano

ACS Nano is a monthly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal, first published in August 2007 by the American Chemical Society. The current editor in chief is Paul S. Weiss (University of California, Los Angeles). The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, perspectives, interviews with distinguished researchers, views on the future of nanoscience and nanotechnology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, ACS Nano has a 2010 impact factor of 9.855. The focus of ACS Nano is synthesis, assembly, characterization, theory, and simulation of nanostructures, nanotechnology, nanofabrication, self assembly, nanoscience methodology, and nanotechnology methodology. The focus also includes nanoscience and nanotechnology research - the scope of which is chemistry, biology, materials science, physics, and engineering.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2007-present
Impact factor
9.855 (2010)
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Art advancing science at the nanoscale

Like many other scientists, Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., the Founding Director of the Wyss Institute, is concerned that non-scientists have become skeptical and even fearful of his field at a time when technology can offer solutions ...

dateOct 18, 2017 in Nanophysics
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Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalyst

Individual nanoscale nuggets of gold, copper, aluminum, silver and other metals that capture light's energy and put it to work are being employed by Rice University scientists who have discovered a way to build multifunctional ...

dateOct 04, 2017 in Nanomaterials
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Self-driving vehicles at the microscale

(Phys.org)—In a new study, scientists have developed the microscale version of self-driving vehicles: a 5-μm spherical micromotor that autonomously navigates its way through micro-traffic along a micro-maze to reach its ...

dateAug 28, 2017 in Nanophysics feature
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Watches, LEDs powered by yarn battery

(Phys.org)—Researchers have fabricated rechargeable batteries by using highly conductive yarns that have a diameter and flexibility similar to that of a piece of cotton yarn. The new yarn battery can be woven into fabric ...

dateAug 25, 2017 in Nanophysics feature
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