ACS Nano is a monthly, peer-reviewed, scientific journal, first published in August 2007 by the American Chemical Society. The current editor in chief is Paul S. Weiss (University of California, Los Angeles). The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, perspectives, interviews with distinguished researchers, views on the future of nanoscience and nanotechnology. According to the Journal Citation Reports, ACS Nano has a 2010 impact factor of 9.855. The focus of ACS Nano is synthesis, assembly, characterization, theory, and simulation of nanostructures, nanotechnology, nanofabrication, self assembly, nanoscience methodology, and nanotechnology methodology. The focus also includes nanoscience and nanotechnology research - the scope of which is chemistry, biology, materials science, physics, and engineering.

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2007-present
Website
http://pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3
Impact factor
9.855 (2010)

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An easily reversed hydrogel male contraceptive

A team of researchers working at China's Fourth Hospital of Harbin Medical University has developed a new kind of male contraceptive that is easily reversed. In their paper published in the journal ACS Nano, the group describes ...

Scientists develop novel circulating tumor DNA biosensor

Nucleic acids analysis is mainly used in pathogen detection, genetic disease identification and early cancer diagnosis. For example, quantitative analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), a free DNA fragment derived from ...

Nanotechnology enables single-cell sorting by function

For nearly 40 years, drugmakers have used genetically engineered cells as tiny drug factories. Such cells can be programmed to secrete compounds that yield drugs used to treat cancer and autoimmune conditions such as arthritis.

Graphene gets enhanced by flashing

Flashing graphene into existence from waste was merely a good start. Now Rice University researchers are customizing it.

Autonomous nanomachines inspired by nature

Inspired by the way molecules interact in nature, UNSW medical researchers engineer versatile nanoscale machines to enable greater functional range.

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