Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research

When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in ...

'Squid skin' metamaterials project yields vivid color display

The quest to create artificial "squid skin"—camouflaging metamaterials that can "see" colors and automatically blend into the background—is one step closer to reality, thanks to a breakthrough color-display technology ...

Chemical biologists find new halogenation enzyme

Molecules containing carbon-halogen bonds are produced naturally across all kingdoms of life and constitute a large family of natural products with a broad range of biological activities. The presence of halogen substituents ...

TRMM satellite sees Hurricane Odile strike Baja California

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM captured data on powerful Hurricane Odile revealing heavy rainfall from powerful thunderstorms as it made landfall in Baja California. Odile tied a record ...

Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean

For multicellular life—plants and animals—to thrive in the oceans, there must be enough dissolved oxygen in the water. In certain coastal areas, extreme oxygen-starvation produces "dead zones" that decimate marine fisheries ...

When rulers can't understand the ruled

Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America's unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them.

Early Earth less hellish than previously thought

Conditions on Earth for the first 500 million years after it formed may have been surprisingly similar to the present day, complete with oceans, continents and active crustal plates.

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