When the river runs high

A massive world-wide study of dry riverbeds has found they're contributing more carbon emissions than previously thought, and this could help scientists better understand how to fight climate change.

Image: Mount Makalu, Himalayas

Mount Makalu in the Himalayas is pictured in this Copernicus Sentinel-2B image from 9 December 2017.

Graphene makes its mark on gas separation

Graphene Flagship researchers overcame the theoretical limiting performance of membranes in gas separation. This collaborative research from Graphene Flagship partners CNR, University of Bologna and Graphene-XT has potential ...

Flatworms found to win most battles with harvestmen

A trio of researchers with Universidade de São Paulo has documented evidence of flatworms and harvestmen engaging in battle in the forests of Brazil. In their paper published in the Journal of Zoology, M. S. Silva. R. H. ...

Primates in peril

Primates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, ...

How to calculate the carbon emissions from your daily commute

The problem with carbon emissions is that they're invisible. Unlike other pollutants, greenhouse gases don't dirty the sidewalk or stink up the air. This makes them easy to forget about and hard to measure in our everyday ...

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