News tagged with massive stars

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Are ultra-luminous galaxies colliding?

(Phys.org) —ltra-luminous infrared galaxies ((ULIRGs) are galaxies whose luminosity exceeds that of a trillion suns, By way of comparison, our Milky Way galaxy has a typical modest luminosity of only about ...

Jun 27, 2014
4.7 / 5 (9) 3

Galaxy winds

(Phys.org) —The most luminous galaxies in our universe are not particularly bright in the visible. Most of their energy output (which can be hundreds or even thousands of times more than our Milky Way's) ...

Sep 23, 2013
4.8 / 5 (5) 1 | with audio podcast

Peering into a gateway opened 50 years ago

Saturday marked the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the quasar - an extremely bright object powered by matter falling into a super-massive black hole lying in the heart of a galaxy.

Mar 17, 2013
4.6 / 5 (7) 3

Image: A storm of stars in the Trifid nebula

(Phys.org) —A storm of stars is brewing in the Trifid nebula, as seen in this view from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE. The stellar nursery, where baby stars are bursting into being, ...

Jan 30, 2014
4.6 / 5 (7) 0 | with audio podcast

Hidden nurseries in the Milky Way

(Phys.org) —APEX, the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, is a telescope of 12 m diameter at an exceptional site on Earth: the Chajnantor plateau is located 5100 m above sea level in the Atacama desert in Chile. ...

May 13, 2014
5 / 5 (5) 0

Shedding light on the power of M 82's superwinds

(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers, led by Dr. Kazuya Matsubayshi (Kyoto University), has discovered that outflows of gas from starburst galaxy M 82 collide with a "cap" of gas clouds 40,000 ...

Jan 19, 2013
4.3 / 5 (4) 12 | with audio podcast

ISOLDE sheds light on dying stars

What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN's REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.

Apr 04, 2014
4.3 / 5 (12) 1

A burst of stars 13 billion years ago

(Phys.org) —The universe immediately following the big bang contained mostly hydrogen and some helium. All the other elements needed to make galaxies, planets, and life were formed in stellar interiors ...

Jun 03, 2013
4.2 / 5 (6) 0 | with audio podcast