Other Sciences - Mathematics news

What does Twitter have to do with the human brain?

(PhysOrg.com) -- We like to think the human brain is special, something different from other brains and information processing systems, but a Cambridge professor is set to test that assumption – by conducting ...

Mar 11, 2011
3 / 5 (2) 1 | with audio podcast

Can bees color maps better than ants?

In mathematics, you need at most only four different colors to produce a map in which no two adjacent regions have the same color. Utah and Arizona are considered adjacent, but Utah and New Mexico, which only share a point, ...

Mar 10, 2011
5 / 5 (1) 2 | with audio podcast

Strength in numbers

Before the information revolution of recent decades, sports analysis largely consisted of vague talk about the intangible qualities of players and teams: games and championships were often said to be won because of heart, ...

Mar 09, 2011
not rated yet 0

Now you see him

Imagine if Harry Potter’s cloak were real , or that you could blot out the sight of something as easily as pressing a mute button to eliminate sound. To some, this seems like “pi in the sky” ...

Mar 08, 2011
4 / 5 (6) 2

Maximum overhang, optimum reward

Yuval Peres, principal researcher at Microsoft Research Redmond and manager of the Theory Group, always advocates both healthy skepticism and an open mind when it comes to problem solving. Even so, Peres was ...

Mar 04, 2011
4.4 / 5 (14) 20

March Madness: Statisticians quantify entry biases

By examining historical data, statisticians in the College of Science at Virginia Tech have quantified biases that play a role in granting Division I at-large basketball teams inclusion in the NCAA March Madness ...

Mar 01, 2011
2 / 5 (1) 1 | with audio podcast

Is March Madness always the same?

Why is it that the same teams seem to dominate the annual men's collegiate basketball tournament? For that matter, why does the same small group of institutions seem to top annual best-college rankings?

Mar 01, 2011
5 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

Number one rules in nature: study

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers from The Australian National University have used a long-forgotten mathematical rule to reveal that in nature the number one dominates, as well as detect natural events like earthquakes ...

Feb 17, 2011
4.7 / 5 (3) 9