Carnegie Institution for Science

Is natural gas a 'bridge' to a hotter future?

Natural gas power plants produce substantial amounts of gases that lead to global warming. Replacing old coal-fired power plants with new natural gas plants could cause climate damage to increase over the ...

dateDec 08, 2014 in Environment
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Overhaul in tropical forest research needed

New work from a team led by Carnegie's Greg Asner shows the limitations of long-used research methods in tropical rainforest ecology and points to new technological approaches for understanding forest structures ...

dateNov 17, 2014 in Environment
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Does dark magma lurk in deep Earth?

(Phys.org) —A key to understanding Earth's evolution is to look deep into the lower mantle—a region some 400 to 1,800 miles (660 to 2,900 kilometers) below the surface, just above the core. Data have ...

dateNov 13, 2014 in Earth Sciences
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Tail discovered on long-known asteroid

A two-person team of Carnegie's Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory has discovered a new active asteroid, called 62412, in the Solar System's main asteroid belt between Mars and ...

dateNov 11, 2014 in Space Exploration
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Biochemistry detective work: Algae at night

Photosynthesis is probably the most well-known aspect of plant biochemistry. It enables plants, algae, and select bacteria to transform the energy from sunlight during the daytime into chemical energy in the form of sugars ...

dateNov 10, 2014 in Biochemistry
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Cell architecture: Finding common ground

When it comes to cellular architecture, function follows form. Plant cells contain a dynamic cytoskeleton which is responsible for directing cell growth, development, movement, and division. So over time, changes in the cytoskeleton ...

dateOct 16, 2014 in Cell & Microbiology
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Water in the solar system predates the Sun

Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth's water is key to understanding how life-fostering ...

dateSep 25, 2014 in Space Exploration
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Solar cell compound probed under pressure

Gallium arsenide, GaAs, a semiconductor composed of gallium and arsenic is well known to have physical properties that promise practical applications. In the form of nanowires and nanoparticles, it has particular ...

dateSep 25, 2014 in Nanophysics
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Most stars are born in clusters, some leave 'home'

New modeling studies from Carnegie's Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. These protostars are born out of rotating clouds ...

dateSep 24, 2014 in Astronomy
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