Carnegie Institution for Science

Carnegie Institution for Science (CIW) was founded in 1902. Until 2007 it was known as the Carnegie Institution. The purpose of the institution is to support in the broadest sense scientific inquiry for the good of humanity. Carnegie grants include observatories and the Hale Telescope on Mount Wilson. Carnegie grants to Nobel Laureates Barbara McClintock, Alfred Hershey and Andrew Fire for their work on genetics continues. Carnegie Institution for Science divides its endeavors into the following departments; Embryology, Geophysical lab, Global Ecology, Observatories, Plant Biology and Terrestrial Magnetism. Carnegie publishes news stories, reports and a variety of scientific publications and books. The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private independent research organization that supports scientific research.

1530 P Street NW • Washington, DC 20005, USA
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Feeding the world by rewiring plant 'mouths'

Plants have tiny pores on their leaves called stomata—Greek for mouths—through which they take in carbon dioxide from the air and from which water evaporates. New work from the lab of Dominique Bergmann, honorary adjunct ...

dateJul 04, 2016 in Biotechnology
shares276 comments 0

Volcanoes get quiet before they erupt!

When dormant volcanoes are about to erupt, they show some predictive characteristics—seismic activity beneath the volcano starts to increase, gas escapes through the vent, or the surrounding ground starts to deform. However, ...

dateJun 23, 2016 in Earth Sciences
shares21 comments 0

Probing giant planets' dark hydrogen

Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe. It's also the simplest—sporting only a single electron in each atom. But that simplicity is deceptive, because there is still so much we have to learn about hydrogen.

dateJun 23, 2016 in Condensed Matter
shares61 comments 11