EU chemical law goes into effect

Jun 01, 2007

The European Chemicals Agency is set to open its doors in Helsinki to enforce the new REACH chemicals law.

The new law, the most complex bill in European Union history, takes effect Friday. It is designed to cut health risks associated with everyday chemicals by forcing companies to register safety information with the agency, the EU Observer said.

REACH stands for Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals.

The agency has hired 40 staffers to begin opening phone lines for companies with questions about the new law.

The first deadline for registering new information is June 2008 but the full legal package will not be in place until 2022, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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