Astronaut Mae Jemison moves to new career

Jan 17, 2006

In 1992 Mae Jemison gained fame as the first black female astronaut to go into space, flying on the shuttle Endeavor.

But Jemison, also a physician, although charging $18,000 for a speech, now concerns herself more with healthcare than her space accomplishments.

She spoke Sunday night at Indiana University-Purdue University 36th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. dinner in Indianapolis.

"Having been an astronaut gives me a platform," she told the Indianapolis Star during an interview before her speech, "but I'd blow it if I just talked about the shuttle."

Instead, she says she now focuses on what she sees as unacceptable disparities in the quality of healthcare in the United States and Third World nations.

"We talk about taking proper care of people, but we don't do it," she said. "We lack the commitment. Martin Luther King was about doing things. He didn't just have a dream, he got things done.

"My message is about seeing possibilities and having the courage to work toward them."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New chemical analysis of ancient Martian meteorite provides clues to planet's history of habitability

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US seeks China's help after cyberattack

2 hours ago

The United States is asking China for help as it weighs potential responses to a cyberattack against Sony Pictures Entertainment that the U.S. has blamed on North Korea.

Why the Sony hack isn't big news in Japan

19 hours ago

Japan's biggest newspaper, Yomiuri Shimbun, featured a story about Sony Corp. on its website Friday. It wasn't about hacking. It was about the company's struggling tablet business.

Hopes, fears, doubts surround Cuba's oil future

20 hours ago

One of the most prolific oil and gas basins on the planet sits just off Cuba's northwest coast, and the thaw in relations with the United States is giving rise to hopes that Cuba can now get in on the action.

Ancient clay seals may shed light on biblical era

20 hours ago

Impressions from ancient clay seals found at a small site in Israel east of Gaza are signs of government in an area thought to be entirely rural during the 10th century B.C., says Mississippi State University archaeologist ...

Recommended for you

Scientists 'map' water vapor in Martian atmosphere

2 hours ago

Russian scientists from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), together with their French and American colleagues, have ...

Water fleas prepared for trip to space

7 hours ago

Local 'Daphnia' waterfleas are currently being prepared by scientists at the University of Birmingham for their trip to the International Space Station (ISS), where they will be observed by astronauts.

The worst trip around the world

7 hours ago

As you celebrate the end of the year in the warmth of your home, spare a thought for the organisms riding with a third-class ticket on the International Space Station – bolted to the outside with no protection ...

Image: Multicoloured view of supernova remnant

7 hours ago

Most celestial events unfold over thousands of years or more, making it impossible to follow their evolution on human timescales. Supernovas are notable exceptions, the powerful stellar explosions that make ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.