Experimental wolf kill program considered

Dec 14, 2005

Officials of a gray wolf reintroduction program in New Mexico and Arizona are reportedly considering allowing ranchers to kill problem wolves.

The committee overseeing the program has proposed several significant changes, including giving Mexican gray wolves more room to roam and ranchers more options for dealing with wolves that prey on livestock, the Albuquerque (N.M.) Journal reported Wednesday.

Noting any changes would require public hearings, Terry Johnson, chairman of the oversight committee, said the recommendations -- part of five-year review of the wolf program -- are "a step forward" in giving the public a clear idea of what program changes are possible.

There are currently about 28 wolves in the wild within the two states, the Journal said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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