Maxtor a top Silicon Valley workplace

Nov 30, 2005

Maxtor Corp. was named among Silicon Valley's best places to work by San Jose Magazine.

Maxtor Corp., a manufacturer of hard disk drives and consumer storage products, is among 44 companies named by San Jose Magazine as the best places to work in Silicon Valley.

The company is noted for numerous perks in an article entitled "Benefits beyond the Fringe" in the magazine's November issue -- including health and dental coverage, telecommuting, on-site gym, on-site cafeteria, tuition reimbursement, service awards, employee assistance program, lactation room, dry cleaning, health and wellness seminars, and discount tickets to local attractions. The magazine also cites Maxtor's support of employee volunteerism in paying for four hours per month for workers volunteering at non-profits.

"We are gratified for the recognition of the programs we've put in place," said John Klinestiver, senior vice president of human resources. "Our goal is for Maxtor to be an employer of choice."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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