Central Europe getting warmer

Nov 11, 2005

Surface temperature analysis of Central Europe shows that temperatures there have risen three times faster than the Northern Hemisphere land average.

Rolf Philipona of Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium in Davos, Switzerland, says that while temperatures and humidity across Europe changed uniformly for individual months, both temperature and humidity strongly increased in value from west to east for all months.

Thermal long wave radiation from the atmosphere was strongly increasing under cloud-free skies and was highly correlated with increasing temperature. The authors show that 70 percent of the increase in the downward long wave radiation was due to increasing water vapor in the atmosphere, while 30 percent was due to increasing manmade greenhouse gases.

These observations combine to suggest that the region is experiencing "positive water vapor feedback," in which carbon dioxide emissions warm the planet, causing more surface water to evaporate. This water vapor, also a greenhouse gas, accumulates in the atmosphere and further increases surface temperatures.

The findings are published in the Geophysical Research Letters.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What do wildfires have to do with climate change?

23 hours ago

As the western U.S. faces its third year of severe drought, firefighters are still battling two large fires in California. The state, which is experiencing its worst drought since record keeping began in ...

Obstacles to a revolution in air technology

Oct 13, 2014

When in 1873 Jules Verne published his novel of planet-trotting high adventure, the world was on the verge of an explosion in global travel. New trans-continental railways and the Suez canal promised an increas ...

Mangroves protecting corals from climate change

Oct 08, 2014

Certain types of corals, invertebrates of the sea that have been on Earth for millions of years, appear to have found a way to survive some of their most destructive threats by attaching to and growing under ...

Recommended for you

Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions

40 minutes ago

Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper ...

Big black holes can block new stars

2 hours ago

Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.

MAVEN studies passing comet and its effects

2 hours ago

NASA's newest orbiter at Mars, MAVEN, took precautions to avoid harm from a dust-spewing comet that flew near Mars today and is studying the flyby's effects on the Red Planet's atmosphere.

POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization

3 hours ago

An international team of physicists has measured a subtle characteristic in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation that will allow them to map the large-scale structure of the universe, ...

How to safely enjoy the October 23 partial solar eclipse

3 hours ago

2014 – a year rich in eclipses. The Moon dutifully slid into Earth's shadow in April and October gifting us with two total lunars. Now it's the Sun's turn. This Thursday October 23 skywatchers across much ...

User comments : 0