EU approves GM maize for animal feed

Nov 03, 2005

The European Commission has reportedly authorized the use of a genetically modified type of corn for animal feed.

EUobserver.com reports the product, know as 1507 maize, has been cleared for use in animal feed, but not yet for human consumption.

The corn, the fourth GM food product approved by the Brussels-based EU, has been genetically modified to resist a series of pesticides and herbicides.

A vote in the EU environmental council in September ended in a deadlock, without the required qualified majority needed to overturn a commission decision to approve the 1507 maize.

The European Food Safety Agency previously concluded 1507 maize posed no threat to human and animal health or the environment, and that 1507 maize is no less safe than any conventional maize, EUobserver said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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