Bird species are saved from extinction

Aug 28, 2006

The first global audit of threatened species shows 16 species of birds nearly extinct in the mid-1990s have been saved, some increasing tenfold in number.

The majority of the bird species studied had populations of fewer than 100 in 1994, The Independent reported, but with international co-operation and funding, conservationists reversed a worldwide decline in bird types.

But environmentalists say the world's governments are still doing too little to save millions of birds from being permanently lost.

Stuart Butchart, author of the report and an expert with the British-based group BirdLife International, told The Independent: "These successes show that preventing extinctions is possible, given political will and concerted action. We need to scale up our efforts considerably to prevent wholesale biodiversity loss and many more extinctions in the coming decades."

The study appears in the journal Oryx.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How do our muscles work? Scientists reveal important new insights into muscle protein

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers find way to turn sawdust into gasoline

22 minutes ago

Researchers at KU Leuven's Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis have successfully converted sawdust into building blocks for gasoline. Using a new chemical process, they were able to convert the cellulose ...

Virtual money and user's identity

23 minutes ago

Bitcoin is the new money: minted and exchanged on the Internet. Faster and cheaper than a bank, the service is attracting attention from all over the world. But a big question remains: are the transactions ...

Recommended for you

Dogs hear our words and how we say them

6 hours ago

When people hear another person talking to them, they respond not only to what is being said—those consonants and vowels strung together into words and sentences—but also to other features of that speech—the ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.