Bird species are saved from extinction

Aug 28, 2006

The first global audit of threatened species shows 16 species of birds nearly extinct in the mid-1990s have been saved, some increasing tenfold in number.

The majority of the bird species studied had populations of fewer than 100 in 1994, The Independent reported, but with international co-operation and funding, conservationists reversed a worldwide decline in bird types.

But environmentalists say the world's governments are still doing too little to save millions of birds from being permanently lost.

Stuart Butchart, author of the report and an expert with the British-based group BirdLife International, told The Independent: "These successes show that preventing extinctions is possible, given political will and concerted action. We need to scale up our efforts considerably to prevent wholesale biodiversity loss and many more extinctions in the coming decades."

The study appears in the journal Oryx.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The science of anatomy is undergoing a revival

Apr 10, 2014

Only two decades ago, when I was starting my PhD studies at the University of California in Berkeley, there was talk about the death of anatomy as a research subject. That hasn't happened. Instead the science ...

One of the last strongholds for Western chimpanzees

Apr 09, 2014

When Liberia enters the news it is usually in the context of civil war, economic crisis, poverty or a disease outbreak such as the recent emergence of Ebola in West Africa. Liberia's status as a biodiversity ...

Measuring water flow in the endangered Coorong

Mar 31, 2014

Flinders University groundwater expert Dr Margaret Shanafield is digging deep to find out how much water should be released upstream to replenish the endangered Coorong Wetlands.

Recommended for you

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

10 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...

Lemurs match scent of a friend to sound of her voice

12 hours ago

Humans aren't alone in their ability to match a voice to a face—animals such as dogs, horses, crows and monkeys are able to recognize familiar individuals this way too, a growing body of research shows.

Chrono, the last piece of the circadian clock puzzle?

14 hours ago

All organisms, from mammals to fungi, have daily cycles controlled by a tightly regulated internal clock, called the circadian clock. The whole-body circadian clock, influenced by the exposure to light, dictates the wake-sleep ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

ESO image: A study in scarlet

This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that ...

First direct observations of excitons in motion achieved

A quasiparticle called an exciton—responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits—has been understood theoretically for decades. But exciton movement within ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern

Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, ...