Microfluidics may be a new method of IVF

Oct 13, 2005

University of Michigan technology more closely mirroring natural fertilization process is showing promise as a new method of in-vitro fertilization.

Researchers in the university Health System say microfluidics -- an emerging area of physics and biotechnology that deals with the microscopic flow of fluids -- can be used for IVF in mice. They also found lower numbers and concentrations of sperm were required when using microfluidic channels instead of culture dishes.

"Now that we are using microfluidics for fertilization, what you are starting to see is the whole IVF process happening on a chip," said Gary Smith, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, urology and physiology.

IVF is a process in which eggs are removed from a woman's body and fertilized with sperm outside the body. Fertilized eggs are then placed in the woman's uterus, where they can develop as in a normal pregnancy.

Lead author Dr. Ronald Suh, now with Urology of Indiana, said, "In the future, you will be able to take patients with low sperm counts, use microfluidics to select the best sperm, and achieve fertilization in one step."

The study appears online in the journal Human Reproduction.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Iliad founder says T-Mobile offer is 'real'

4 hours ago

French telecom upstart Iliad's founder said Friday that the company's offer for US-based T-Mobile is "real" and that he is open to working with partners on a deal.

Law changed to allow 'unlocking' cellphones

4 hours ago

President Barack Obama signed a bill into law on Friday making it legal once again to unlock a cellphone without permission from a wireless provider, so long as the service contract has expired.

Social network challenges end in tragedy

4 hours ago

Online challenges daring people to set themselves ablaze or douse themselves in ice water are racking up casualties and fueling wonder regarding idiocy in the Internet age.

Microsoft sues Samsung alleging contract breach

4 hours ago

Microsoft on Friday sued Samsung in federal court claiming the South Korean giant had breached a contract over cross-license technology used in the fiercely competitive smartphone market.

Recommended for you

Soccer's key role in helping migrants to adjust

13 hours ago

New research from the University of Adelaide has for the first time detailed the important role the sport of soccer has played in helping migrants to adjust to their new lives in Australia.

How dinosaurs shrank, survived and evolved into birds

15 hours ago

That starling at your birdfeeder? It is a dinosaur. The chicken on your dinner plate? Also a dinosaur. That mangy seagull scavenging for chips on the beach? Apart from being disgusting, yet again it is a ...

Children's book explores Really Big Numbers

15 hours ago

A new children's book written and illustrated by a Brown mathematics professor Richard Schwartz takes readers on a visual journal through the infinite number system. Schwartz hopes Really Big Numbers will ...

User comments : 0