Globecom set for St. Louis

Oct 12, 2005

More than 1,500 telecommunications researchers from across the United States are expected in St. Louis next month for Globecom 2005.

The annual conference of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers -- organized by Ann Miller, professor of computer engineering at the University of Missouri-Rolla -- is designed to allow sharing of research and discussions of security and other communications-related issues.

"This is an umbrella kind of conference, meaning we cover almost anything in communications," Miller said. "We'll ... have 18 different sessions focused on topics like wireless networking, security and quality of service."

UMR graduate Gary Forsee, chairman and CEO of the Sprint Corp., will present the keynote address, "Redefining the Telecommunications Industry."

Joan Woodard, executive vice president at Sandia Laboratories and another UMR graduate, will also speak during the meeting.

Tutorials on topics ranging from tracing cyber attacks to advances in wireless local area networks are planned.

"We'll also have a whole set of sessions on critical military communications issues," Miller said. "We'll look at everything from operations to engineering design to research activities."

The event will be held at the Renaissance Hotel in St. Louis Nov. 28-Dec. 2.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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