Television on the go

Oct 06, 2005

Television via cell phone or PDA is an emerging market. At the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin, Fraunhofer researchers demonstrated how digital films can be transmitted to portable devices in good quality. The secret: dynamic bandwidth allocation using the DVB-H standard.

Mobility – a creed for the modern age. For many, this means constantly being on the move, whether it's in the car, on a train or in the air. Time spent on the road is not restricted to getting work done either. After all, everyone needs a break to catch the news, get the latest football results or to watch a favorite TV series. The demand for high quality video keeps rising. At the same time, consumers have more and more types of product and transmission media to choose from, particularly for mobile applications.

"Devices in the near future will contain three converging technologies: conventional television broadcasting, wireless technology and the Internet," says Thomas Schierl from the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications in Berlin. "This means everyone will have ubiquitous access to special TV programming – perhaps some even tailored to the user's location." Supplementary information such as related Web pages can also be called up. In addition, users can surf the Internet and receive E-mails in typical fashion. All of this is possible using the Internet protocol – or IP as it's called.

At the IFA in Berlin, Schierl and his team showcased a digital television system for mobile devices based on the Digital Video Broadcasting for Handhelds (DVB-H) standard. The system provides good quality video transmission while optimizing the use of the available DVB-H channel. This is a key feature because with DVB-H, multiple television programs share a single channel. Different types of broadcast require different data rates. During a news broadcast with an announcer, the frame rate – the speed at which the images change – is less than when transmitting a track and field event, a football game or an action film. "It can happen that one station doesn't need to send at the maximum data rate to achieve optimal quality, while at this same point in time another station needs the full bandwidth."

"We developed a live server system that dynamically allocates transmission rates for each program," explains Schierl, who adds that the principle is referred to as statistical multiplexing. At the IFA, the researchers even demonstrated the system's capability to send live broadcasts to cell phones. Special servers encode the live images and align the video data rates across the individual programs within the DVB-H channel.

Source: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Explore further: Audi to develop Tesla Model S all-electric rival

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Form Devices team designs Point as a house sitter

12 hours ago

A Scandinavian team "with an international outlook" and good eye for electronics, software and design aims to reach success with what they characterize as "a softer take" on home security. Their device is ...

Man pleads guilty in New York cybercrime case

15 hours ago

A California man has pleaded guilty in New York City for his role marketing malware that federal authorities say infected more than a half-million computers worldwide.

Recommended for you

Audi to develop Tesla Model S all-electric rival

8 hours ago

The Tesla Model S has a rival. Audi is to develop all-electric family car. This is to be a family car that will offer an all-electric range of 280 miles (450 kilometers), according to Auto Express, which ...

A green data center with an autonomous power supply

13 hours ago

A new data center in the United States is generating electricity for its servers entirely from renewable sources, converting biogas from a sewage treatment plant into electricity and water. Siemens implemented ...

After a data breach, it's consumers left holding the bag

14 hours ago

Shoppers have launched into the holiday buying season and retailers are looking forward to year-end sales that make up almost 20% of their annual receipts. But as you check out at a store or click "purchase" on your online shopping cart ...

Can we create an energy efficient Internet?

14 hours ago

With the number of Internet connected devices rapidly increasing, researchers from Melbourne are starting a new research program to reduce energy consumption of such devices.

Brain inspired data engineering

15 hours ago

What if next-generation ICT systems could be based on the brain's structure and its cognitive and adaptive processes? A groundbreaking paradigm of brain-inspired intelligent ICT architectures is being born.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.