NASA names new Glenn Center director

Sep 22, 2005

NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Thursday announced the appointment of Woodrow Whitlow Jr. as director of the John Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

Whitlow has been serving as deputy director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. He succeeds Julian Earls, who is retiring at the end of the year.

The Glenn Research Center, with about 3,300 civil service and contract employees, is a key NASA research center for aeronautical propulsion, space propulsion, space power, space communications and microgravity sciences in combustion and fluid physics.

The center consists of 24 major facilities and more than 500 specialized research facilities at a 350-acre site adjacent to Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, and the 6,400-acre Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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