In Brief: New Edge speeds non-broadband card payment

Apr 20, 2006

New Edge Networks has a narrowband Internet solution to process credit-card transactions in areas without broadband access.

The Always-On Internet Service provides a constant connection between a store and the processing center without the need to dial in each time a transaction is made.

"Our Always-on Internet Service is an effective interim access option until DSL service is available for merchants that cannot justify the cost of filling in non-DSL locations with frame relay connections," said New Edge Vice President Greg Griffiths.

The service is available for about $100 per month and requires a dedicated business-grade phone line; however, the line can be shared by multiple cash registers.

New Edge is making use of network interconnections through EarthLink, which completed its acquisition of Vancouver-based New Edge earlier this month.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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