Current cancer therapy may become obsolete

Apr 19, 2006

A Washington University study in St. Louis suggests cancer therapy based on a tumor's anatomical location may soon become obsolete.

When researchers compared cancerous tumors they found the location of a tumor did not correlate as to how the cancer interacted with standard anticancer drugs.

The researchers say their findings suggest traditional cancer treatments establishing different drug regimens for brain, prostate or ovarian cancer, for example, should eventually be replaced with therapies that use drugs deemed to be of highest benefit based on the tumor's pharmacologic profile.

"This study is the first time the pathway for a drug's effect has been analyzed in tumors from different anatomical locations," said Howard McLeod, director of the pharmacology core at the Siteman Cancer Center and a member of the National Institutes of Health Pharmacogenetics Research Network.

"If further studies confirm a tumor-specific approach is better than the current anatomical emphasis, oncologists may have to stop thinking of themselves as colon cancer or breast cancer specialists and let the cancer tell them which drugs to use for each specific patient," McLeod said.

The study will appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Pathology.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Local education politics 'far from dead'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Report: China to declare Qualcomm a monopoly

1 hour ago

(AP)—Chinese regulators have concluded Qualcomm Inc., one of the biggest makers of chips used in mobile devices, has a monopoly, a government newspaper reported Friday.

Scientists stalk coastal killer

2 hours ago

For much of Wednesday, a small group of volunteers and researchers walked in and out of the surf testing a new form of surveillance on the biggest killer of beach swimmers - rip currents.

Recommended for you

F1000Research brings static research figures to life

6 hours ago

F1000Research today published new research from Bjorn Brembs, professor of neurogenetics at the Institute of Zoology, Universitaet Regensburg, in Germany, with a proof-of-concept figure allowing readers and reviewers to run ...

How science can beat the flawed metric that rules it

8 hours ago

In order to improve something, we need to be able to measure its quality. This is true in public policy, in commercial industries, and also in science. Like other fields, science has a growing need for quantitative ...

User comments : 0