Global-warming talk to broadcast over IPTV

Apr 18, 2006

Some 16,000 science classes will partake in a global-warming debate via the Earth Day Network using the new PowerTV Network over Internet Protocol television.

Participating in the live, two-way IPTV video/chat broadcast on April 21 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. will also be nine leading scientific and religious experts.

"The panelists for Earth Day Network's live chat are leading members of the global warming community and have all contributed significantly to the world's understanding of climate change," said Jeff Nesbit, vice president of communications at the Earth Day Network. "This major leap forward in our education efforts means that we will be able to reach literally hundreds of thousands of young minds at the same time -- and to get feedback from many of them as well."

Global experts come from scientific institutions at Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, Berkeley as well as the Pew Center on Global Climate Change.

Religious leaders present will include a Muslim chaplain from Georgetown University along with representatives from the National Association of Evangelicals, the Greater Washington Interfaith Power and Light Project and the Unitarian Universalist Church.

The event will also launch Chantilly, Va.-based Communication Technologies Inc.'s "Power TV" Network, an $11 million, three-year development distributed over the firm's private hybrid global IP network that uses an integration of fiber, wireless, broadband-over-power-lines and satellite distribution to power the service, according to COMTek.

The broadcast can be found at www.earthdaynetwork.tv.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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