Hair restoration techniques improve

Apr 18, 2006

U.S. experts say men losing their hair can rejoice that better techniques for restoring their hair are in the horizon.

The desperation remedies of dog urine and snake oil are long gone, having been replaced by transplants techniques. But even these techniques will soon make way for higher-tech remedies, reports The Los Angeles Times.

Modern methods mostly just save hair that already exists or move the individual hairs around on the scalp but researchers are looking to the day when they can remove a few hairs, multiply them in a lab and fill in a bald spot.

Others are working on creams that can stop and start hair growth whenever and wherever they like.

"I think, ultimately, we will find a way to take a single follicle and clone it, to re-create it in a petri dish -- and that solves all of our problems," Dr. Claire Haycox, a professor of medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle told the newspaper.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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