Study: Prematurely born babies feel pain

Apr 06, 2006

Prematurely born babies do, indeed, feel pain, say researchers at University College London.

Earlier research showed babies born prematurely displayed signs of pain and distress, but the behavioral, psychological and metabolic examinations provided only indirect measurements, researchers said.

The team, reporting its finding in the Journal of Neuroscience, said the brain scans it took on 18 prematurely born infants proved they experience pain.

"We have shown for the first time that the information about pain reaches the brain in premature babies," lead author Maria Fitzgerald told the BBC.

Reacting to the study, support group Bliss said, "There is no justification for babies to be in pain" and prematurely born babies should be given pain relief when they are subjected to painful procedures.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: The Ancient Maya and virtual worlds: Different perspectives on material meanings

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Book says 'Big Data' becoming a global nervous system

Dec 06, 2012

When Rick Smolan attended a parent-teacher meeting at his kids' New York City school recently, a spirited discussion broke out about why students were being allowed to text and post on social sites during school hours.

Recommended for you

Bloody souvenir not from decapitated French king: DNA

6 hours ago

Two centuries after the French people beheaded King Louis XVI and dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, DNA analysis has thrown new doubt on the authenticity of one such rag kept as a morbid souvenir.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Study links California drought to global warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...

Autism Genome Project delivers genetic discovery

A new study from investigators with the Autism Genome Project, the world's largest research project on identifying genes associated with risk for autism, has found that the comprehensive use of copy number variant (CNV) genetic ...