Boyfriends blamed for women's weight gain

Apr 06, 2006

Moving in with a boyfriend and breaking up with a boyfriend cause women to gain weight, British researchers say.

Men, however, tend to lose weight during new relationships and at least hold steady following breakups, say University of Newcastle researchers in an examination of other dietary studies.

Lead author Amelia Lake cited the so-called "honeymoon" period, when couples tend to take on each other's eating habits, for women's weight gain and men's weight loss.

Women tend to eat healthier foods while men tend to eat higher-fat fare, she said.

"Couples who move in to together should use the opportunity of the honeymoon period to make positive changes to their diet and lifestyle by working together and supporting each other," Lake told the London Daily Mail.

The study was published in the journal Complete Nutrition.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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