UCSF study: ER myths exploded

Apr 04, 2006

A University of California-San Francisco study suggests, contrary to popular belief, emergency rooms treat insured and non-insured people equally.

Popular opinion holds that people who frequent emergency rooms are there because they lack insurance. But the UCSF study says that is largely a myth. Researchers report they determined most patients making frequent emergency room visits are insured and have a regular source of healthcare, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

The study determined that, given the variety of serious illnesses low-income patients suffer, it is not inappropriate for them to also seek emergency room treatment.

"In many cases, the emergency department is exactly the right place for them to be," said Dr. Ellen Weber, one of the study's authors.

The research is detailed in the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: The significance of digits: just how reliable are reported numbers?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Health record app for Google Glass developed by Drchrono

Jun 15, 2014

The future of Google Glass in health care appears to be by now not a question of if but a question of where and when. Philips Healthcare, in its explorations into health care's future, created a video that ...

Recommended for you

Golden Ratio offers unity of science

47 minutes ago

Researchers from the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria are also suggesting that the "Golden Ratio" – designated by the Greek symbol ∅ (letter Phi) with a mathematical value of about 1.618 – also relates ...

Consumer sentiment brightens holiday spending

3 hours ago

Consumer confidence posted its fourth consecutive monthly gain in November, rising to its highest level since July 2007, according to the Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers.

Woolly mammoth skeleton sold at UK auction

18 hours ago

The skeleton of an Ice Age woolly mammoth fetched £189,000 ($300,000, 239.000 euros) at auction Wednesday as it went under the hammer in Britain with a host of other rare or extinct species.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.