Tea: the New Anti-Aging Beverage?

Mar 30, 2006
Green tea

Tea may be more than a trendy coffee alternative, according to researchers at the Douglas Hospital Research Centre (DHRC). Their findings, published in a recent issue of the European Journal of Neuroscience, suggest that regular consumption of either black or green tea may reduce the risk of age-related degenerative brain disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

“We looked at the protective effects of two tea extracts and their main constituents, called catechins, on dying nerve cells,” says senior author Rémi Quirion, PhD, Scientific Director of the DHRC and of the Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction (CIHR). “Our findings showed that administration of both black and green tea extracts and catechins strongly blocked death of neurons. This is the first study to show this beneficial effect of both black and green tea.”

Quirion and his colleagues used cultured nerve cells (also called neurons) for this study and exposed them to amyloid, a protein believed to cause Alzheimer disease. This molecule was toxic and caused cell death in the cultures. However cell cultures that received amyloid followed by tea extracts and catechins administration were rescued and survived.

“These findings clearly show a pivotal protective role of catechins in the nervous system,” says Stéphane Bastianetto, a DHRC scientist and lead author. “Although we haven’t conducted human clinical experiments, this research does suggest that a regular consumption of tea, green or black, may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s”.

Source: McGill University

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microsoft unveils Xbox in China as it faces probe

58 minutes ago

Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled its Xbox game console in China, the first to enter the market after an official ban 14 years ago, even as it faces a Chinese government probe over business practices.

Classic Lewis Carroll character inspires new ecological model

59 minutes ago

Inspired by the Red Queen in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, collaborators from the University of Illinois and National University of Singapore improved a 35-year-old ecology model to better understand how species ...

Recommended for you

Soccer's key role in helping migrants to adjust

49 minutes ago

New research from the University of Adelaide has for the first time detailed the important role the sport of soccer has played in helping migrants to adjust to their new lives in Australia.

How dinosaurs shrank, survived and evolved into birds

2 hours ago

That starling at your birdfeeder? It is a dinosaur. The chicken on your dinner plate? Also a dinosaur. That mangy seagull scavenging for chips on the beach? Apart from being disgusting, yet again it is a ...

Children's book explores Really Big Numbers

2 hours ago

A new children's book written and illustrated by a Brown mathematics professor Richard Schwartz takes readers on a visual journal through the infinite number system. Schwartz hopes Really Big Numbers will ...

User comments : 0